My Blog

Posts for: July, 2013

By Chauvin & Chauvin, D.D.S.
July 29, 2013
Category: Dental Procedures
PlanningYourWeddingDaySmileMakeover

You're planning for one of the most important days in your life — your wedding — and you want everything to be perfect. You've chosen the outfits, the setting, the flowers... but there's one more thing to think about. Is your smile just as bright as your hopes for the future? Do you wish you could improve its appearance in time for the big date?

Here's good news: You can! Depending on how much advance notice you have — and what level of enhancement you need — your wedding day smile makeover can range from a thorough dental cleaning to a full-scale orthodontic treatment program. Let's look at a few options that can help you look and feel your best on this very special day.

Getting your teeth thoroughly, professionally cleaned can help remove some surface stains and tartar in just one appointment! Depending on the level of discoloration, and how long it's been since your last cleaning, more than one session may be needed. You have this basic and effective treatment done every three to six months anyway — right? So, be sure and schedule one before your wedding!

Sometimes your smile needs more than just routine maintenance. If that's the case, there are many other options to help it look its best. Tooth whitening is a safe, effective and economical way to lighten teeth by several shades. In-office treatments are quicker and more predictable, but dentist-supervised at-home bleaching kits are also an option if you have more time.

Porcelain veneers offer a more striking and more permanent solution for discolored teeth. To get the optimum “wow” effect from this treatment, figure from two to four office visits, and a total treatment time of at least three months.

Cosmetic bonding is a great way to hide those little chips in the front teeth, or discolored old fillings in back. Using the newest high-tech materials and a dose of old-fashioned artistry, we can restore the shiny, translucent look of your natural teeth — only with fewer imperfections. After a thorough evaluation, cosmetic bonding can often be performed as a one-visit procedure.

If your smile needs even more help, don't despair — there are still plenty of ways to improve it.

Teeth that are damaged or missing can be restored by crowns or bridgework. When the roots are intact, a crown replaces the visible part of the tooth above the gum line. If the tooth is missing, a bridge is used to secure a false tooth to two abutments on either side. Properly done, these restorations may last a decade or more, and generally require two or more visits.

Dental implants are a great way to restore missing teeth. They offer a permanent, natural-looking tooth replacement with numerous advantages over other restorative treatments. Achieving these results requires careful planning and takes a bit more time. If you need tooth restoration, be sure to ask us whether dental implants might be right for you.

If you would like more information about a wedding-day smile makeover, don't hesitate to contact us or schedule an appointment to discuss your treatment options. You can learn more in the Dear Doctor magazine article “Wedding Day Smiles.”


By Chauvin & Chauvin, D.D.S.
July 19, 2013
Category: Oral Health
Tags: tooth decay   dry mouth  
DryMouth-CausesRisksandCures

A consistently dry mouth is not only uncomfortable and unpleasant but also probably more serious than you think. Dry mouth, medically known as xerostomia (“xero” – dry; “stomia” – mouth) affects millions of people, but few understand why it happens or why it is important.

What Causes Dry Mouth?

It is normal to awaken with a dry mouth because saliva flow decreases at night. But if your mouth is persistently dry throughout the day, it may be a result of habits such as smoking, alcohol or too much coffee drinking or even dehydration. It is also a common side effect of some medications. Xerostomia is not a disease in itself, but it could be a symptom of salivary gland or other systemic (general body) disease.

Why is Saliva Important?

A persistently dry mouth can be a problem. Not only does it feel unpleasant and lead to bad breath, it can also significantly increase your risk for tooth decay. Saliva lubricates your mouth for chewing, eating, digestion and even speaking. Saliva also has important antibacterial activities. Most importantly normal healthy salivary flow neutralizes and buffers acids in the mouth to protect the teeth from the acids produced by bacteria on the teeth that cause decay, and by acids in sodas, sports drinks and juices that can erode tooth enamel.

Not only does saliva neutralize acids but with its high mineral content it can actually reverse de-mineralization — the process by which acids attack enamel and remove calcium from the enamel surface. Healthy saliva actually re-mineralizes the outer layers of tooth enamel, but the process can take 30-60 minutes. That's why it's important not to snack on sugars or drink sodas between meals — one an hour and your mouth is acidic all the time.

Individuals without enough saliva are especially at risk for root decay and fungal infections, and they are also more likely to lose tooth substance through abrasion and erosion.

What Can We Do for a Dry Mouth?

If your mouth is usually dry, make an appointment with us to assess the causes of the problem. However it may be more serious with medical implications. The solution may be as simple as drinking more water and using good daily oral hygiene, or it may necessitate prescription medication to promote more saliva flow.

Contact us today to schedule an appointment to discuss your dry mouth and what we can do to help. For more information read the article in Dear Doctor magazine “Tooth Decay – How To Assess Your Risk.”


By Chauvin & Chauvin, D.D.S.
July 08, 2013
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral health   mouth rinse  
ChoosingtheRightMouthRinsethatMatchesyourOralHealthNeeds

There are dozens of brands of mouthwashes and rinses on drugstore shelves that American consumers buy each year for clean breath and oral health. But the question is do they really work?

To properly answer that, you should first know that mouth rinses fall into two general categories: cosmetic and therapeutic. A cosmetic rinse can give you a temporary “clean” feeling in the mouth (usually masking bad breath with a more pleasant smell) but in the long run doesn't contribute to better oral health. On the other hand, therapeutic rinses do enhance oral health; they contain one or more ingredients that can help prevent the development of tooth decay and/or inhibit bacterial growth.

Although some therapeutic rinses are prescribed by dentists, many are available over-the-counter (OTC). Decay-fighting rinses usually contain sodium fluoride, which has been amply demonstrated to strengthen the surface of teeth and thus inhibit tooth decay and the likelihood of new cavity development — but only when used in combination with good hygiene practices. Anti-bacterial rinses contain ingredients such as triclosan, zinc or essential oils like menthol that reduce the level of bacteria in plaque (when also coupled with good oral hygiene). This also helps reduce the growth of decay.

For some patients a prescription rinse may be in order, especially during recuperation from oral surgery or where normal plaque control is difficult. The most common rinse contains chlorhexidine, a chemical that prevents bacteria from sticking to the teeth. The effectiveness of chlorhexidine, especially in helping to control gingivitis (inflammation of the gums) and preventing tooth decay, is well-documented after many years of research and use. While it may cause teeth staining in some patients, the staining can be alleviated by ultrasonic scaling or polishing.

So then, should you incorporate a mouth rinse into your daily hygiene regimen, and if so, what kind? That will depend on your own individual oral health needs, which we can advise you on. Knowing what your own needs are and the different kinds of mouth rinses and what they are designed to do, you can make an informed choice.

If you would like more information on the use of mouthwashes or rinses, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Mouthrinses.”